Author: Editor

Writing & Publishing at BH7

We recently published two new Nick Caldwell novels, Dead Crowe and A Christmas Project, by Wm. Sharpe, and we are working on a story line for a seventh Caldwell novel, scheduled for late summer or early fall publication.

We also are working on our first book of stories about the Ancient Order of Celtic BearhounDs. Titled BearhounD Tales, it is designed for parents to read to young children, older children to read on their own, and it will have available separately a coloring book featuring all the dogs included in Tales.

We also want to recommend books by one of our favorite St. Louis writers M. Catherine Bunton. Her works include Rest & Re-creation, Book of Sweets, and Yours Truly for adults and her many books in juvenile literature. Readers will enjoy the Star Girl series and books highlighting people and places that make up St. Louis and its history. Coming soon will be Back Seat Buddies, a collection of short stories for children, as told by some of her most endearing characters.

This edition of BH7 introduces a local writer and her first novel, set in 19th century England. Since many novels of the era were first published in serial form, we will be publishing at least some of this novel in serial format before it is released in book form. The third installment of White Roses and Iron, the Gothic Adventures of Lily Schreiff by Barbara Neuhaus can be found on our Publications page.

Be sure to follow us on our podcasts, Uncommon Sense Radio 3.0 and Novel Approach. And we think our long-awaited podcast, hosted by BearhounDs Baron and Ruby, may be coming soon. These two, who are regulars in the Nick Caldwell novels, should have a lot of interesting things to share with us. Subscribe to the podcasts so you don’t miss out on story telling at BearhounD7 ProductionS.

Two Exciting New Books

By Wm. Sharpe

We have two new novels now available and more on the way. Not Forgotten is the third novel in the Nick Caldwell detective series. In this adventure Nick and his team solve a 40-year-old cold case of the murder of a young couple in Saint Louis. In so doing Nick also catches a serial killer who has killed other couples in several states.

When Christmas Trees Flew tells the story of a 10-year-old boy’s experiences from Thanksgiving to New Years day. This bitter sweet  story recounts the last big family Christmas gathering before a death changes the boy and his family forever.

My third novel, Uncle Joe Is Dead, was released in 2018. You can get either a hard copy or e-book through Amazon, Barnes and Noble or Kindle.

My editor, the scholar and gentleman, James R. Sodon has urged me to write a few words about the book. I thought I was done when I wrote the two-hundred plus pages that are in the book. I guess I am supposed to tell you the inside story about Uncle Joe Is Dead and about writing the book.

The title of the book was the message I received from one of my good friends when his great uncle Joe died. I remembered it because I thought Uncle Joe would go on forever. His uncle was a good and generous guy who some would have called a hoarder, but I would call a collector of over stocked merchandise. Since I too am a collector of stuff that others discard and from second-hand stores, I understood Uncle Joe’s interest. I like to think of us as pioneers in reuse technology or, if you prefer, dumpster divers work too.

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Did I Do That?

By Lara Sodon

So I did something on Saturday afternoon…maybe I should start at the beginning. My paternal grandmother moved to Table Rock Lake when I was a baby. My granddad and my grandma bought a plot of land from friends who had moved down there and built a house and resort. My grandparents planned to build their house right next door. Picture a STEEP Ozark mountain. There was a family owned campground at the top of the mountain, a gravel road that led to the two houses and the resort below that. My grandparents’ house had nothing but trees between their house and the lake…maybe 100 yards.

If my memory serves me, the story I was told was that my grandparents sold their house in St Louis and moved to the lake. My granddad laid the concrete foundation and got the framing done (side note: my granddad built most of the houses that he and my grandma lived in. There are at least 3 houses in St. Louis that I could take you to right now that he built, and they are still standing, and people live in them). Anyway, Dec 1972, my granddad died suddenly, and no the house was not complete!

The situation was assessed. and it was determined that my grandma was not in a position to walk away so my dad helped complete the house! My grandma lived in that house until 1998. Most of my memories of my grandma are in that house. We moved her to St Louis in 1998 for a variety of reasons. She had some health issues that were not helped by living on an Ozark mountainside; her friends/neighbors/original owners of the land/resort were either moving or getting ready to move to warmer weather and the family owned campground was being sold or had been to a corporation. Just wasn’t a good idea for my grandma to be there by herself.

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Origin of the BearhounD Stories

Bill Sharpe explains why he wrote the BearhounD stories

Author’s Note:

This was the first BearhounD story I wrote down. It was not the first BearhounD story that I told my four-year old daughter and her four-year old friends. The whole BearhounD story started one summer afternoon when I was working in the yard. Sondra had two friends over and they decided that they would “help” me.

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Starbuck, the family dog, was never very far from Sondra and if she wasn’t available, he would settle for me. For the record Starbuck was not named after the premium priced coffee company in Seattle. Starbuck was named for a fictional character from the play and film The Rainmaker; the film starred Burt Lancaster. Starbuck was named in 1986, a good six years before you could get a latte from the coffee company in Seattle.

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Mystery novels and trench coats – professor debuts first detective book

Viktoria Muench | Editor-in-Chief March 17, 2016; 1:45 p.m.

Professor Sharpe on his way to class in the Spellmann Center.  Photo by Kelby Lorenz

He storms into the classroom of Mass Communication Theory with a large cup of coffee in his hand and his briefcase dangling from his shoulder. Instead of saying “Good morning,” Bill Sharpe simply grunts.

His students smirk, because they know they are about to hear another story about his life and daily encounters, told with a form of grumpy sarcasm that is unique to the communications professor.

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